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FIGURE 4–12. Pick's disease: lateral view of the brain.Very severe atrophy ("knife blade") is most pronounced in the frontal and temporal lobes.

FIGURE 4–13. Pick's disease: coronal section through the basal ganglia.This disease causes profound atrophy of the cortex. The ventricles are widely dilated. The caudate nucleus is flattened.

FIGURE 4–14. Pick's disease: hippocampal formation, fascia dentata.Pick's bodies are round, densely homogeneous argyrophilic inclusions that fill the cytoplasm of virtually every neuron. Like neurofibrillary tangles, they contain abnormally assembled tau proteins. (Glees silver stain; original magnification x400.)

FIGURE 4–15. Pick's disease: hippocampal formation, Ammon's horn.Pick's bodies are seen here within pyramidal neurons. (Glees silver stain; original magnification x1,000.)

FIGURE 4–16. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with tau-negative, ubiquitin-positive inclusions: hippocampal formation, fascia dentata.Tau-negative, ubiquitin-positive inclusions (arrows) are small granular cytoplasmic inclusions that are best observed in the small neurons of the fascia dentata of the hippocampus. These inclusions cannot be seen on routine histological preparations. They stain positively only for ubiquitin. They lack tau, -amyloid, -synuclein, and other proteins that are present in the other major neurodegenerative disorders. (Ubiquitin immunostain; original magnification x1,000.)

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