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Methamphetamine use, abuse, and dependence in the United States has increased from 1995–2005.

Chronic methamphetamine use produces significant medical and psychiatric symptoms, including cardiovascular and respiratory system irregularities, neurological abnormalities, skin and dental problems, as well as psychosis, dysphoria, and anhedonia.

Symptomatic treatment for methamphetamine-related psychosis, intoxication, and withdrawal using antipsychotics and benzodiazepines is the current accepted practice.

Numerous groups require special attention regarding methamphetamine-related consequences. They are methamphetamine injectors, adolescents, women, and men who have sex with men.

Current psychosocial treatments with demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of cocaine disorders appear appropriate for treatment of methamphetamine users. These include: cognitive-behavioral therapy, community reinforcement approach, contingency management, 12-step facilitation, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse drug counseling approach.

Contingency management and the Matrix Model are the only two psychosocial approaches with data to support their efficacy for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence.

Many medications currently show promise as pharmacotherapies for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence, but currently none have clearly demonstrated efficacy.

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