0
0

Sections

Excerpt

Your session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In to Access Full Content
 
Username
Password
Sign in via Athens (What is this?)
Athens is a service for single sign-on which enables access to all of an institution's subscriptions on- or off-site.
Not a subscriber?

Subscribe Now/Learn More

PsychiatryOnline subscription options offer access to the DSM-5 library, books, journals, CME, and patient resources. This all-in-one virtual library provides psychiatrists and mental health professionals with key resources for diagnosis, treatment, research, and professional development.

Need more help? PsychiatryOnline Customer Service may be reached by emailing PsychiatryOnline@psych.org or by calling 800-368-5777 (in the U.S.) or 703-907-7322 (outside the U.S.).

FIGURE 8–11. Magnetic resonance image of hippocampal volume (arrows) in a healthy control subject (A) and a patient with Alzheimer's disease and hippocampal atrophy (B).Source. Reprinted with permission from Foster NL, Minoshima S, Kuhl DE: "Brain Imaging in Alzheimer Disease," in Alzheimer Disease, 2nd Edition. Edited by Terry RD, Katzman R, Bick KL, et al. Philadelphia, PA, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1999, p. 69, Figures 2A and 2B. Copyright 1999, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

FIGURE 8–12. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study of a healthy older control subject and a patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD).The patient demonstrates bilateral temporal and parietal hypometabolism with some involvement of the posterior cingulate gyrus and relative preservation of primary cortex and basal ganglia. Metabolic activity is greatest in the visual cortex.Source. Reprinted with permission from Valk PE, Bailey DL, Townsend DW, et al.: Positron Emission Tomography: Basic Science and Clinical Practice. London, Springer-Verlag, 2003, pp. 343, 344.

FIGURE 8–13. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study of a patient with late-stage Alzheimer's disease.This patient shows widespread hypometabolism that is still most pronounced in temporal and parietal cortex and maximal in the left hemisphere (right side of the image). There is relative preservation of metabolism in visual cortex and sensorimotor cortex bilaterally.Source. Reprinted with permission from Valk PE, Bailey DL, Townsend DW, et al.: Positron Emission Tomography: Basic Science and Clinical Practice. London, Springer-Verlag, 2003, pp. 343, 344.

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).
Related Content
Articles
Books
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychiatry, 5th Edition > Chapter 2.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 10.  >
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 5.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychiatry, 6th Edition > Chapter 4.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Psychopharmacology, 4th Edition > Chapter 10.  >
Psychiatric News
PubMed Articles
Temporal stability of network partitions. Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys 2014;90(2-1):022813.
 
  • Print
  • PDF
  • E-mail
  • Chapter Alerts
  • Get Citation