0
0

Sections

Excerpt

The category of stimulants includes cocaine, amphetamine, and amphetamine-like substances. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health there were an estimated 1 million new cocaine users in 2004, and about 1% of the U.S. population ages 12 years or older had used cocaine within the past 30 days (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration 2005). Amphetamine-type substances come in several different forms. Powdered methamphetamine hydrochloride ("speed," "meth," or "crank") can be snorted, injected, or dissolved in beverages. Pills can be prescription medications such as dexamphetamine or clandestinely manufactured tablets of powdered methamphetamine. Freebase methamphetamine (sometimes called "ice") can be vaporized in a pipe or on aluminum foil and insufflated (smoked), producing as rapid a high as with injection but without having to use needles (Maxwell 2005). The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime estimated that 30 million people worldwide are using amphetamine-type stimulants, primarily methamphetamine, compared with an estimated 15 million people who use opioids and 13 million who use cocaine (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime 2004). The geographical spread of methamphetamine use is being seen in both rural and urban settings. Alarmingly, although the total number of past-year and past-month methamphetamine users did not change significantly between 2002 and 2004, the number of past-month methamphetamine users who met criteria for abuse or dependence increased from 27.5% in 2002 to 59.3% in 2004 (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration 2005).

Your session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In to Access Full Content
 
Username
Password
Sign in via Athens (What is this?)
Athens is a service for single sign-on which enables access to all of an institution's subscriptions on- or off-site.
Not a subscriber?

Subscribe Now/Learn More

PsychiatryOnline subscription options offer access to the DSM-5 library, books, journals, CME, and patient resources. This all-in-one virtual library provides psychiatrists and mental health professionals with key resources for diagnosis, treatment, research, and professional development.

Need more help? PsychiatryOnline Customer Service may be reached by emailing PsychiatryOnline@psych.org or by calling 800-368-5777 (in the U.S.) or 703-907-7322 (outside the U.S.).

Table Reference Number
TABLE 9–23. DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for cocaine or amphetamine intoxication
Table Reference Number
TABLE 9–24. DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for cocaine or amphetamine withdrawal

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).
Related Content
Articles
Books
Manual of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 7th Edition > Chapter 8.  >
Gabbard's Treatments of Psychiatric Disorders, 4th Edition > Chapter 4.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment, 4th Edition > Chapter 10.  >
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment, 4th Edition > Chapter 11.  >
Gabbard's Treatments of Psychiatric Disorders, 4th Edition > Chapter 16.  >
Psychiatric News
PubMed Articles
Emerging drugs of abuse: current perspectives on substituted cathinones. Subst Abuse Rehabil 2014;5():37-52.doi:10.2147/SAR.S37257.
Synthetic cathinones: "a khat and mouse game". Toxicol Lett 2014;229(2):349-56.doi:10.1016/j.toxlet.2014.06.020.
 
  • Print
  • PDF
  • E-mail
  • Chapter Alerts
  • Get Citation