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Figure 6–8. Procedure for obtaining a PET scan.The patient receives an intravenous injection of the radioactive tracer while lying in a darkened room. After 20–30 minutes are spent in the darkened room to allow the tracer to distribute through the brain, the patient is ready to be scanned (A). Scanning usually begins within 1 hour of tracer injection and requires 30–45 minutes to complete. A headholder is often used to prevent head motion (B). PET = positron emission tomography.Source. Pictures courtesy of CTI Molecular Imaging, Inc., Knoxville, TN.

Figure 6–9. PET imaging then and now.Axial positron emission tomography (PET) images acquired in 1983 and 2010 of normal brain. Note the significant improvement in resolution since the 1980s.Source. 1983 pictures courtesy of CTI Molecular Imaging, Inc., Knoxville, TN.

Figure 6–10. Serial axial fluoride-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET images of a normal adult brain.PET = positron emission tomography.Source. Case contributed by Dr. Donald P. Eknoyan, W.G. (Bill) Hefner VA Medical Center, Salisbury, NC.

Figure 6–11. Current PET imaging capabilities.Three-dimensional reconstruction of positron emission tomography (PET) results (A) and fusion of computed tomography and PET (B) improve appreciation of the extent of functional abnormalities. Neurotransmitter systems may also be imaged with PET. Presynaptic dopamine terminals can be labeled with 18F-fluorodopa (C). Dopamine D2 receptors can be labeled with 11C-N-methylspiperone (D).Source. Pictures courtesy of CTI Molecular Imaging, Inc.
Table Reference Number
Table 6–3. U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved, commonly used tracers/radioligands for PET

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