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FIGURE 2–11. Neuroreceptor imaging.Magnetic resonance imaging (A, C, E, G, I) and co-registered positron emission tomography images (B, D, F, H, J) acquired from 40 to 100 minutes following injection of 14.9 mCi [11C]DASB in a 40-year-old healthy male volunteer. A, B: Sagittal plane close to the midline, showing accumulation of activity in the midbrain, thalamus, and caudate. This picture also illustrates the low level of activity in the cerebellum. Activity concentration is also seen in the cortical gray matter (cingulate cortex). C, D: Transaxial plane, illustrating activity concentration in thalamus and striatum. E, F: Transaxial plane at the level of the midbrain. The very high activity concentration is seen at the level of the dorsal raphe. The amygdala is also seen on this plane. G, H: Coronal plane at the level of the anterior striatum, illustrating the ventrodorsal gradient of SERT in the striatum. This view also shows activity concentration in cingulate and temporal cortices. I, J: Coronal plane at the level of the postcommissural striatum, illustrating activity concentrations in the caudate and putamen, in the thalamus, and in the amygdala.Source. Images courtesy of Gordon Frankle, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

FIGURE 2–12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of working memory.Increased regional blood flow evident in prefrontal cortex while a subject is performing the Sternberg Task (left image). Corresponding images in Brainsight™ Frameless used for stereotactic targeting with transcranial magnetic stimulation (right images).Source. Images courtesy of Ziad Nahas, MD, MSCR, Department of Psychiatry, Medical College of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.

FIGURE 2–13. Functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a neuroscience tool.fMRI interleaved with TMS over left prefrontal cortex in healthy volunteers illustrating both local and transsynaptic functional connectivity of cortical-subcortical networks.Source. Images courtesy of Ziad Nahas, MD, MSCR, Department of Psychiatry, Medical College of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.

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